Tag Archives: Earl Hines

Art Hodes(1)

April 18.2017

Photo above of Art Hodes by courtesy of Blue Note Records

Recently I purchased the 10 inches record of BlueNote label.

It is “Art Hodes and his hot 7”.

Also last week Jazz Journalists Doug Ramsey introduced a television program hosted by Art Hodes.Go here

So I would like to post about Art Hodes.

Art Hodes was born November 14, 1904 in born in Ukraine.

When he was six months old few, his family settled in Chicago

In those days the pioneering New Orleans musicians came to Chicago in the 1920’s.

Louis Armstrong standing beside King Oliver. Photo courtesy of neajazzintheschools.org.

When he was in his late teens and early twenties, he heard some jazz legends’ performance such as King Oliver, Louis Armstrong, and Jelly Roll Morton and Earl Hines and Jimmy Noone in the nightspots of his city.

Eventually, Hodes played with Armstrong, and later with Wingy Manone, Gene Krupa, and Muggsy Spanier.

Photo above of Wingy Manone by courtesy of alchetron.com

Also he was fond of the blues, and was greatly influenced by Bessie Smith.

In 1938 he moved to New York and played with Joe Marsala and Mezz Mezzrow before forming his own band in 1941.

最近、BlueNoteの10インチレコード”Art Hodes and his hot 7″を購入しました。
同じ日に偶然、Art Hodesが出演していたテレビ番組がネットで紹介されました。
そんなわけで私はArt Hodesに詳しくないので、今回調べてみようと思いました。
Art Hodesは1904年11月14日に帝政ロシアのウクライナで生まれました。
幼少時に彼の家族と共にアメリカに移民しシカゴに定住しました。
当時のシカゴにはニューオーリンズから有名なミュージシャン達が来ていました。
彼は10代後半から20代初めにかけて、King Oliver, Louis Armstrong, Jelly Roll Morton, Earl Hines,Jimmy Noone などの生演奏を聞いていました。
又、Wingy Manone、Gene Krupa、Muggsy Spanier達と演奏をしていました。
彼はブルースも大好きで Bessie Smithからも影響を受けました。
1938年にはニューヨークに移ります。1941年に自己のバンドを結成する迄、Joe Marsala や Mezz Mezzrowと共演していました。

Here is Doug Ramsey’s post “Bud Freeman and Art Hodes on Jazz Alley.”

Here is Jelly Roll Morton and his Red Hot Peppers play “Dr. Jazz”(1926)

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The Jazz Workshop(4)

February 09.2017

various-pianoworkshopberlin1965

“Piano Workshop” was held in Berlin October 30, 1965.

This event was organised by Joachim Ernst Berendt.

He wanted to show the development of jazz piano.

So he did not choose Oscar Peterson and Erroll Garner.

Photo above of Joachim Ernst Berendt

Photo above of Joachim Ernst Berendt

Earl Hines was the father of jazz piano improvisation.

Teddy Wilson was on hand to represent the swing piano style.

Lennie Tristano served as an exponent of modern exploratory piano playing.

It seems unnecessary to explain about Bill Evans and John Lewis.

Jaki Byard alternated free and stride passages on the same tune.

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Unfortunately Bud Powell could not participate because of sickness.

Also two pianists could not participate.

Thelonious Monk was touring Europe with his own band.

Photo above of Eroll Garner with Art Tatum from hipstersanctuary.com

Photo above of Eroll Garner with Art Tatum from hipstersanctuary.com

Art Tatum already had died in 1956.

The program began started from Earl Hines.

Then Teddy Wilson, John Lewis, Lennie Tristano, Bill Evans, and Jaki Byard appeared in order.

The piano players were supported by bassist Niels-Henning Ørsted Pedersen and drummer Alan Dawson.

Here is Earl Hines plays “Memories of you”.

Here is Earl Hines & Teddy Wilson play “All Of Me”.

Here is John Lewis trio play “Django”.
NHØP(b);Connie Kay(ds)

Here is Lennie Tristano Piano Solo plays “G Minor Complex”.

Here is Bill Evans trio play “Beautiful Love”.

Here is Jaki Byard plays “Free Improvisation”.

Maybeck Recital Hall series of Concord Records(1)

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In 1972 Concord Records was established by Carl Jefferson who was a local automobile dealer and jazz fan.

Since then, the label won 88 Grammy Award nominations and 14 Grammy Awards.

This week I want to post Maybeck Recital Hall series of Concord Records.

From 1920s into 1930’s, solo piano recitals were held by legend pianists.

James P. Johnson, Earl ‘Fatha’ Hines, Thomas ‘Fats’ Waller and Teddy Wilson.

Art Tatum was the epitome of Jazz solo piano.

Erroll Garner, Nat Cole, Lennie Tristano, George Shearing and Oscar Peterson continued the tradition of solo piano into the modern jazz era.

The Concord Jazz, Maybeck Recital Hall series stands out as somewhat of an anomaly.

Unfortunately over the second half of the 20th century, solo Jazz piano became something of a lost art with fewer except Keith Jarrett live recording.